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Natalie K. Zelensky (Music) Performing Tsarist Russia in New York: Music, Émigrés, and the American Imagination Indiana University Press (2019)
Natalie K. Zelensky (Music)
Performing Tsarist Russia in New York: Music, Émigrés, and the American Imagination
Indiana University Press (2019)

At the end of the Russian Civil War, in 1922, the vanquished foes of the Bolsheviks fled to Turkey and other safe havens, leaving behind the trappings of privilege but carrying with them the memories—and songs—of their past lives. Zelensky, an expert on the music of the Russian diaspora, examines the culture that First Wave émigrés brought to New York City, recreating a mythologized version of their past that influenced everything from Tin Pan Alley to Broadway to the “Foxtrotsky.” Zelensky opens with her meeting with the great-grandson of Count Leo Tolstoy (in Florida in 2009), where he presented her with a recording of family renditions of pre-revolutionary Russian gypsy and folk songs. It’s a fascinating exploration of one fleeting musical chapter preceded by another.


Catherine Besteman (Anthropology) and Hugh Gusterson, editors Life by Algorithms: How Roboprocesses Are Remaking the World University of Chicago Press (2019)
Catherine Besteman (Anthropology) and Hugh Gusterson, editors
Life by Algorithms: How Roboprocesses Are Remaking the World
University of Chicago Press (2019)

The storage, sorting, and analysis of massive amounts of information have enabled the automation of decision-making at an unprecedented level. Meanwhile, computers have offered a model of cognition that increasingly shapes our approach to the world. The result is a proliferation of “roboprocesses.” Contributions from a distinguished cast of scholars in anthropology, communications, international studies, and political science (including the editors) shows how the perils of modern technology affect finance, medicine, education, housing, the workplace, food production, public space, and emotions—and how they are a manifestation of deeper defects in the fundamental ordering of our society.


Milan Babík ’01 (Government) The Poetics of International Politics: Fact and Fiction in Narrative Representations of World Affairs Routledge (2019)
Milan Babík ’01 (Government)
The Poetics of International Politics: Fact and Fiction in Narrative Representations of World Affairs
Routledge (2019)

Babík brings together some atypical international-theory bedfellows in his second book, examining the fictions of factual stories about international relations and the factual foundations of and implications of fictional accounts of world events. As he challenges the autonomy of academic international relations as the only source of serious knowledge about world affairs and calls for active engagement with literary art, Babík breaks down the distinction between factual and fictional representations. Social-science narratives are revealed as exercises in rhetoric, while the work of novelists Don DeLillo and Milan Kundera are shown to have political roots and agendas.


Lydia Moland (Philosophy) Hegel’s Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism Oxford University Press (2019)
Lydia Moland (Philosophy)
Hegel’s Aesthetics: The Art of Idealism
Oxford University Press (2019)

The first comprehensive interpretation of Hegel’s philosophy of art in 30 years proves to be a departure from earlier examinations of the views of the influential thinker who is seen as both “the father of art history” (an exaggeration, the author says) and the “prophet of art’s end.” Moland explores newly available sources from the philosopher’s lectures to more fully explore Hegel’s philosophy of art, which she contends is important for its own sake but also to gain better understanding of his aesthetics and his philosophical idealism.


Jory Raphael ’02 Goes Without Saying Onion River Press (2019)
Aaron R. Hanlon (English)
A World of Disorderly Notions: Quixote and the Logic of Exceptionalism
University of Virginia Press (2019)

What do Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver, Royall Tyler’s Updike Underhill, Tabitha Gilman Tenney’s Dorcasina Sheldon, and Washington Irving’s Diedrich Knickerbocker have in common with Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote? Their characteristics and logic, writes Hanlon. By examining various Quixote-like protagonists from British and American literature, Hanlon establishes not only a strong relationship between these fictional characters but also between the logic of quixotism and of exceptionalism. Challenging the sense that quixotism lacks intellectual consistency, Hanlon traces Don Quixote’s worldwide fame to the character’s logic. “Quixotism is a coherent disposition common to quixotes of vastly differing politics and demographics in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries, and that disposition is fundamentally a form of exceptionalism,” he writes.


Raffael Scheck (History), Fabien Théofilakis, and Julia Torrie, coeditors German-Occupied Europe in the Second World War Routledge (2019)
Raffael Scheck (History), Fabien Théofilakis, and Julia Torrie, coeditors
German-Occupied Europe in the Second World War
Routledge (2019)

The Audrey Wade Hittinger and Sheldon Toby Katz Professor of History, Scheck collaborated with colleagues from the Sorbonne and St. Thomas University in Canada in editing and contributing to this exploration of Nazi occupations with attention to relations between occupiers and local populations and differences among occupation regimes. Discussion of occupation of Italy, Norway, and France is accompanied by broader topics, including Scheck’s chapter on genocide and an organizing principle in the work of Raphael Lemkin, the Polish-born jurist who lost 49 family members to the Nazis and coined the word “genocide.”


Megan Cook (English) The Poet and the Antiquaries: Chaucerian Scholarship and the Rise of Literary History, 1532-1635 University of Pennsylvania Press (2019)
Megan Cook (English)
The Poet and the Antiquaries: Chaucerian Scholarship and the Rise of Literary History, 1532-1635
University of Pennsylvania Press (2019)

Chaucer’s reputation precedes him. But how did he become the hottest poet in 16th-century England? Cook tells the rest of the story, showing how antiquarians were involved in the publication of six folio editions of Chaucer’s work in the 16th century, and how their interest in the poet wasn’t necessarily literary. Historians, lexicographers, religious polemicists, and others had a role in ensuring Chaucer’s lasting cultural and literary importance. Said the Times Literary Supplement, “Cook’s survey of the early centuries of Chaucer reception gives a powerful sense of the ways in which he was co-opted in various conceptualizations of nation, language, faith, and history.”


Megan Cook (English) and Elizaveta Strakhov John Lydgate’s Dance of Death and Related Works Western Michigan University Medieval Institute Publications (2019)
Megan Cook (English) and Elizaveta Strakhov
John Lydgate’s Dance of Death and Related Works
Western Michigan University Medieval Institute Publications (2019)

We know that we all must die, yet we can’t imagine our own death. That paradox is explored in John Lydgate’s 15th-century poem, “The Dance of Death,” which is considered here along with a new translation of Lydgate’s French source, the “Danse Macabre.” This volume brings together new editions of both texts with related Middle English verse from the 14th and 15th centuries. Together, these poems showcase the power and versatility of the danse macabre motif, offering a vivid, often grotesque, and darkly humorous window into life and death in late medieval Europe.


Mary Ellis Gibson (English), editor Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835-1905: Five Tales of Speculation, Resistance and Rebellion Anthem Press (2019)
Mary Ellis Gibson (English), editor
Science Fiction in Colonial India, 1835-1905: Five Tales of Speculation, Resistance and Rebellion
Anthem Press (2019)

Move over H.G. Wells and Jules Verne. The icons of science fiction emerged decades after writers in India used the genre as a response to colonial violence and political instability. In this revealing and surprising work, Gibson considers five stories that contribute to a new understanding of the connections between science fiction and empire. English and Indian writers alike responded to the cultural dislocation of colonial India by envisioning very different societies—dystopian and utopian. The Panama Canal causes a disastrous flood; women practice science and men stay home to take care of the house—in the 19th century a bold fiction, indeed.


Nikky-Guninder K. Singh (Religious Studies) The First Sikh: The Life and Legacy of Guru Nanak Penguin Random House India (2019)
Nikky-Guninder K. Singh (Religious Studies)
The First Sikh: The Life and Legacy of Guru Nanak
Penguin Random House India (2019)

In her new book, Colby’s Crawford Family Professor of Religion reconstructs the life of Guru Nanak, the 15th-century founder of the Sikh religion. Singh’s multifaceted approach puts forth a well-rounded biography that not only presents Guru Nanak’s personality and background, but also his teachings and philosophy. The book also sheds light on how Guru Nanak’s teachings and philosophy have been perceived at different times, successfully outliving him for centuries.


Nikky-Guninder K. Singh (Religious Studies) Hymns of the Sikh Gurus Penguin Random House India (2019)
Nikky-Guninder K. Singh (Religious Studies)
Hymns of the Sikh Gurus
Penguin Random House India (2019)

Poems from the most sacred texts of Sikh religion come together in a new book by the Crawford Family Professor of Religion. Singh’s book includes the translations of Guru Granth Sahib, the religion’s primary sacred text, and the Dasam Granth, a collection of devotional verses. These texts, still widely used, convey the Sikh belief in the oneness of the Divine and the equality of all humans.


Correction, and an Award
A photo caption in the spring 2019 issue of Colby Magazine misidentified the department affiliation of historian Elizabeth Leonard. Leonard is the John J. and Cornelia V. Gibson Professor of History Emeritus. The caption in question accompanied an article about her latest book, Slaves, Slaveholders, and a Kentucky Community’s Struggle toward Freedom, published by the University Press of Kentucky. Subsequent to publication of that review, the book was awarded the Thomas D. Clark Medallion Award, which is given to a book that is worthy of the high standards for research and writing exemplified by the award’s namesake, the late, distinguished historian Thomas D. Clark.


Michael Ames ’02 and Matt Farwell American Cipher: Bowe Bergdahl and the U.S. Tragedy in Afghanistan Penguin Press (2019)
Michael Ames ’02 and Matt Farwell
American Cipher: Bowe Bergdahl and the U.S. Tragedy in Afghanistan
Penguin Press (2019)

Hours after Private First Class Bowe Bergdahl walked away from his forward operating base in Afghanistan in June 2009, the Army scoured the remote region for its missing soldier. The goal: find Bergdahl before he was whisked into Pakistan, out of reach of U.S. forces. Despite hundreds of patrols and countless hours sifting intelligence, the Taliban found Bergdahl and held him for more than four years, abusing him when not videotaping him begging for release. Stateside he was denounced as a deserter and collaborator. Worse, he was blamed for the deaths of his fellow soldiers killed in the desperate effort to recover him alive. Was he a traitor or a whistleblower? Ames and Farwell explore all sides of this confused conflict.


Robert Stone and Alan Andres ’76 Chasing the Moon Ballantine (2019)
Robert Stone and Alan Andres ’76
Chasing the Moon
Ballantine (2019)

A half century later, the moon landing remains one of mankind’s most momentous achievements. This companion book to the PBS film tells the story with new depth and clarity. In today’s era of high-tech wonder, the audacious work that led to men on the moon is still mind boggling. JFK’s assignment was completed with derring-do, and the book explores the roles of some unexpected players: science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke, Wernher von Braun, pioneering Poppy Northcutt. Stone and Andres tell the story for new generations as well as for those that experienced this wondrous time firsthand.

A Q&A with Alan Andres ’76 about his experience exploring the space program is in Colby Magazine online.


Christian Davenport ’95 The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos Public Affairs (2018)
Christian Davenport ’95
The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos
Public Affairs (2018)

Why on earth would billionaires invest so much to develop companies like Elon Musk’s SpaceX or Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin? Davenport explores exactly how these entrepreneurial strongmen got into the business of space travel—and were able to make money in the process. Space Barons is a biography of these billionaire entrepreneurs—include Richard Branson and Paul Allen—and their ambitions to not only found companies like Amazon and Microsoft, but to aim for the moon, Mars, and beyond. A Washington Post staff writer, Davenport offers exclusive interviews with all four billionaires as they tell why they seek to end government’s monopoly on space.


Wendy Swallow ’76 Searching for Nora: After the Doll’s House Peavine Mountain Press (2019)
Wendy Swallow ’76
Searching for Nora: After the Doll’s House
Peavine Mountain Press (2019)

This novel is the culmination of Swallow’s 10-year quest to give life to the damaged castaway Nora Helmer, the protagonist of Henrik Ibsen’s iconic play, A Doll’s House. Her novel describes what could have been for Nora, following her as she makes her way out of Norway to the American West. Nora’s revival in the United States is concurrently chronicled with the story of her granddaughter Solvi, a young woman in early 20th- century Norway navigating her way through the peril of World War I, an arranged marriage, and a quest for the education her recently deceased father wanted her to pursue.Wendy Swallow ’76


James Tharin Bradford ’04 Poppies, Politics, and Power: Afghanistan and the Global History of Drugs and Diplomacy Cornell University Press (2019)
James Tharin Bradford ’04
Poppies, Politics, and Power: Afghanistan and the Global History of Drugs and Diplomacy
Cornell University Press (2019)

There’s the conventional narrative around Afghan opium: that conflict and instability are at the center of illicit opium production and its expansion. Then there’s a new narrative by historian James Tharin Bradford ’04, who argues that drug control, “particularly the prohibitions of opium, contributed to the gulf between state and society, which laid the foundation for Afghanistan to become the stateless, lawless, war-ravaged place where opium thrives to this day.” Each effort at prohibition caused a wider rift between the state and its people, as opium not only molded Afghanistan’s relationship with other countries but also with its own society, Bradford argues.


Dan Maccarone ’98 and Bob Sullivan The Barstool MBA: Why Running a Bar Beats Running to Business School Audible Original (2019)
Dan Maccarone ’98 and Bob Sullivan
The Barstool MBA: Why Running a Bar Beats Running to Business School
Audible Original (2019)

As cofounder of two digital design firms that helped launch companies like Hulu and Rent the Runway, Maccarone took his mojo to the bar business when he created Destination, a travel-themed bar in New York City’s East Village. With journalist and author Bob Sullivan, Maccarone delivers an audiobook that divulges important tips not only on running a bar, but on building a brand, differentiating a business, dealing with rejection and criticism, and creating impassioned customers. Peppered with humorous anecdotes about poor Yelp reviews and difficult employees, The Barstool MBA also provides practical advice that can be applied to any company, brand, or startup.


Sam Brakeley ’10 Skiing with Henry Knox: A Personal Journey Along Vermont’s Catamount Trail Islandport Press (2019)
Sam Brakeley ’10
Skiing with Henry Knox: A Personal Journey Along Vermont’s Catamount Trail
Islandport Press (2019)

Brakeley had always been an outdoor enthusiast, wild adventurer, and limit chaser. So when he came across the story of Henry Knox, a Revolutionary War-era military engineer who was the first to walk what is now the Catamount Trail, Brakeley resolved to undertake the journey. Knox, famous for many exploits—including traveling 300 miles up the New England coast to deliver 60 tons of armaments to his American comrades—inspired Brakeley at a turning point in his life. His story is one of ambition, frozen ski-boots, and self-reflection with narration as vivid as it is compelling. A riveting winter read.


Gregory F. Beatty ’86 and Natchariya “Mai” Snow Flake and the Big Race Amazon
Gregory F. Beatty ’86 and Natchariya “Mai”
Snow Flake and the Big Race
Amazon

Eager to help his Thai-speaking daughter Mai transition to an English-speaking school, Beatty joined with Mai in writing a funky, outlandish chapter book about Snow Flake and her struggle to make friends at her new school. The twist? Snow Flake has gigantic feet. Complete with witty character names and eccentric illustrations by Colin Cotterill, the book tackles more than big feet. It addresses bullying, making friends, overcoming challenges, and feeling accepted. Mai and Beatty hope readers identify with Snow Flake’s uniqueness, accept it, own it, and carry on. When uniqueness is a resource rather than a barrier, big things—pun intended—can happen.


Jory Raphael ’02 Goes Without Saying Onion River Press (2019)
Jory Raphael ’02
Goes Without Saying
Onion River Press (2019)

Designer and illustrator Raphael turned his passion for icons into an engaging and thought-provoking palm-size book. By giving new meanings to icons, he created more than a hundred rebuses for idioms, movies, works of literature, and plays. The book also has a section just for James Bond movies. Some of his creative usages include symbolizing the idiom “curiosity killed the cat,” famous film The Breakfast Club, and J. D. Salinger’s landmark novel Catcher in the Rye.


Richard Cass ’73 Last Call at the Esposito Encircle (2019)
Richard Cass ’73
Last Call at the Esposito
Encircle (2019)

The fourth installment in Cass’s Elder Darrow mystery series plunges readers into the world of the recovering alcoholic and Boston bar owner, the city’s mob underworld, and the hardball played by Boston’s movers and shakers. The plot involves a bid to bring the Olympic Games to Boston (razing the bar in the process) and a fresh corpse in a pauper’s cemetery (a relentless community activist), all parts of a twisting tale that Cass tells in graceful crime-noir prose that echoes Raymond Chandler, but with a distinct Boston accent.


Gerry Boyle ’78 Random Act Islandport Press (2019)
Gerry Boyle ’78
Random Act
Islandport Press (2019)

This time the crime comes to freelance reporter Jack McMorrow in this long-running mystery series. McMorrow witnesses a brutal daylight murder at a big-box store, the victim a local woman who tried to strike up a conversation with him moments before. Troubled by guilt (if he’d chatted, would she be alive?), McMorrow sets out to peel back the layers of what seems to be a closed case. The trail takes him to old-money Mt. Desert Island, hardscrabble Downeast towns, and the warrens of Maine’s city-dwelling homeless as he reveals the murder to be anything but a random act.


James Martin ’70, P’20 and James E. Samels The New American College Town Johns Hopkins University Press (2019)
James Martin ’70, P’20 and James E. Samels
The New American College Town
Johns Hopkins University Press (2019)

What exactly is a college town in America today? Martin and Samels examine some perennial examples (State College, Pa., Raleigh, N.C.) but, more importantly, look at the emerging models that have seen colleges and universities (including Colby) as economic drivers for a community and a region. The book includes a Q&A with President David Greene, who discusses Colby’s efforts to revitalize Waterville. “A thriving city is good for everyone,” Greene says. Hear, hear!


Faculty Publications

S. Tariq Ahmad (Biology) coauthor, “Expression of mutant CHMP2B linked to neurodegeneration in humans disrupts circadian rhythms in “Drosophila,” FASEB BioAdvances, Volume 1, Issue 8, 1-10, July 1, 2019.

Coauthor, “Expression of a human variant of CHMP2B linked to neurodegeneration in Drosophila external sensory organs leads to cell fate transformations associated with increased Notch activity,” Developmental Neurobiology, 1-13, 2019.

Marta Ameri (Art), “Variations on a Theme: Iconographic Variability in the Horned Anthropomorphic Figures of the Indus Civilization,” Artibus Asiae, Volume 79, Issue 1, July 2019.

Catherine Besteman (Anthropology), “Border Regimes and the New Global Apartheid,” Middle East Report 290, Spring 2019.

“On Ethnographic Unknowability,” in Scholars and Writers: Writing Anthropology, Ethnography, and Beyond, Duke University Press, 2019.

Contributor, Militarization: A Reader, Duke University Press, 2019.

Adrian Blevins (English), “Fox Heart” in A Literary Field Guide to Southern Appalachia, University of Georgia Press, 2019.

“Semantic Relations” in Bounty Everlasting: Poetry from 25 Years of Southern Cultures, Southern Cultures/Center for the American South, 2019.

Robert Bluhm (Physics and Astronomy), and Hannah Bossi ’18 and Yuewei Wen ’18, “Gravity with Explicit Spacetime Symmetry Breaking and the Standard-Model Extension,” Physical Review D 100, Oct. 2019.

Denise Bruesewitz (Environmental Studies) coauthor, “Prevalence of nitrogen and phosphorus colimitation of freshwater phytoplankton explained by nitrogen deposition and lake characteristics across northeastern United States,” Inland Waters, 2019.

Michael Burke (English), “A Maine River Guide Reflections on Taking His Grown Kids Paddling,” AMC Outdoors, Appalachian Mountain Club, Aug. 26, 2019.

Caitrin Eaton (Computer Science), Trisha Ramdhoni ’21, and Riley Karp ’19, “Exploring structural control of stiffness in synthetic tendon,” Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and Support Technologies for Mobile Machines, 26-33, Aug. 2019.

Carlos Gardeazábal Bravo (Spanish), “Violence, Slow and Explosive: Spectrality, Landscape, and Trauma in Evelio Rosero’s Los ejércitos,” in Ecofictions and Ecorealities of Latin America and the Hispanic/Latino-a/Latinx Worlds, 2019.

Robert Gastaldo (Geology) coauthor, “A Multidisciplinary Approach to Review the Vertical and Lateral Facies Relationships of the Purported Vertebrate-defined Terrestrial Boundary Interval at Bethulie, Karoo Basin, South Africa,” Earth Science Reviews, Volume 189, 220-243, 2019.

Coauthor, “Discussion of ‘Permian—Triassic vertebrate footprints from South Africa: Ichnotaxonomy, producers and biostratigraphy through two major faunal crises,’” Gondwana Research, 2019.

Coauthor, “Testing the Daptocephalus and Lystrosaurus Assemblage Zones in a Lithostratographic, Magnetostratigraphic, and Palynological Framework in the Free State, South Africa,” PALAIOS, Volume 34, 2019.

Mary Ellis Gibson (English), “Regionalism and Provincialism: Where is the Local?” in The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature, Routledge, 2019.

Cheryl Townsend Gilkes (African-American Studies and Sociology), “Red Summer, Trump Summer and the politics of hate,” Religion News Service, Aug. 16, 2019.

Jin X. Goh (Psychology) coauthor, “Does Concealing a Sexual Minority Identity Prevent Exposure to Prejudice?” Social Psychology and Personality Science, Volume 10, Issue 8, 1056-1064, Feb. 27, 2019.

Neil Gross (Sociology), “Why Do the Democrats Keep Saying ‘Structural’?” New York Times, July 31, 2019.

Samara Gunter (Economics), “Your Biggest Refund, Guaranteed? Internet Access, Tax Filing Method, and Reported Tax Liability,” International Tax and Public Finance, Volume 26, Issue 3, 536-570, 2019.

Aaron Hanlon (English), “Centering the Humanities,” Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 9, 2019.

“Fanny Hill and the Legibility of Consent,” English Literary History, Volume 86, Issue 4, Winter 2019.

“The Real Threat to Free Speech on Campus Isn’t Coming from the Left,” Washington Post, Oct. 15, 2019.

Adam Howard (Education), “Enduring Privilege: Schooling and Elite Formation in the United States,” Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, April 2019.

Joshua Martin (Biology) coauthor, “Predatory behavior changes with satiety or increased insulin levels in the praying mantis (Tenodera sinensis),” Journal of Experimental Biology, June 11, 2019.

Dámaris Mayans (Spanish) coauthor, “Nominal agreement in the interlanguage of Dutch L2 learners of Spanish,” International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, July 11, 2019.

Mark Mayer (English), “The Clown,” in The Best American Mystery Stories, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct. 1, 2019.

Lindsay Mayka (Government), “Society-Driven Participatory Institutions: Lessons from Colombia’s Planning Councils,” Latin American Politics and Society, Volume 61, Special Issue 2, 2019.

Coauthor with Andrés Lovón ’21, “How one company’s deep web of corruption took down governments across Latin America,” Washington Post, May 23, 2019.

Coauthor, “State Transformation and Participatory Politics in Latin America,” Latin American Politics and Society, Volume 61, Special Issue 2, May 2019.

Coauthor, “Border Regimes and the New Global Apartheid,” Middle East Report 290, Spring 2019.

Coauthor, “The Politics of Participation in Latin America: New Actors and Institutions,” Latin American Politics and Society, Volume 61, Special Issue 2, May 2019.

Coauthor, “Brazil’s Supreme Court Pushed Back against an Attempt to Cancel Participatory Councils,” Mischiefs of Faction blog, Vox, July 8, 2019.

Loren McClenachan (Environmental Studies) coauthor, “Views from the dock: Warming waters, adaptation, and the future of Maine’s lobster fishery,” Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, March 2019.

Coauthor, “Shifting perceptions of rapid temperature changes’ effects on marine fisheries, 1945–2017,” Fish and Fisheries, Volume 20, Issue 6, 1-13, 2019.

Coauthor, “Challenges to natural and human communities from surprising ocean temperatures,” PNAS, Sept. 10, 2019.

Kerill O’Neill (Classics), “Creating a Space for the Humanities: Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities,” Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes, July 25, 2019.

Laurie Osborne (English), “Teaching Global Shakespeare: Visual Culture Projects in Action,” in The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Global Appropriation, Routledge, 2019.

“Variations in Visual Culture Projects for Teaching Global Shakespeare,” in The Routledge Handbook of Shakespeare and Global Appropriation, Routledge, 2019.

Keith Peterson (Philosophy), Nicolai Hartmann Ontology: Laying the Foundations, Walter De Gruyter, Oct. 2019.

Véronique Plesch (Art) guest editor, Maine Arts Journal: UMVA [Union of Maine Visual Artists] Quarterly, Fall 2019.

Elizabeth Sagaser (English), “‘Tis Centuries – and yet’: Teaching Dickinson and the Presence of the Past,” in Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Volume 31.2, Nov.-Dec. 2019.

Laura Seay (Government), “To Cure Ebola Will Take More Than a Pill,” Foreign Affairs, Sept. 4, 2019.

Tanya Sheehan (Art and American Studies), “On Display: The Art of African American Photography,” in Routledge Companion to African American Art History, New York: Routledge, 92-103, 2019.

“Vernacular Photography: A Plurality of Purposes,” in Pictures with Purpose: Early Photography at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 16-22, 2019.

Jay Sibara (English), “Three Bullets,” in Moss: A Journal of the Pacific Northwest, June 2019.

Coeditor, Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities, University of Nebraska Press, June 2017.

Steven Simon (International Relations) coauthor, “America’s Great Satan: The 40-Year Obsession With Iran,” Foreign Affairs, November/December 2019.

Coauthor, “How Trump Can Escape His Iran Jam,” Politico, Sept. 24, 2019.

Christopher Soto (Psychology), “How replicable are links between personality traits and consequential life outcomes? The Life Outcomes of Personality Replication Project,” Psychological Science, Volume 30, Issue 5, 711-727, 2019.

Coauthor, “Optimizing the length, width, and balance of a personality scale: How do internal characteristics affect external validity?” Psychological Assessment, Volume 31, 444-459, 2019.

Coauthor, “The Big Five Inventory–2: Validating a personality inventory to capture 5 personality domains and 15 facets,” Diagnostica, Volume 65, 121-132, 2019.

Coauthor, “Are cultural and economic conservatism positively correlated? A large-scale cross-national test,” British Journal of Political Science, Volume 49, 1045-1069, 2019.

Debra Spark (English), “Something Had Gone Wrong,” Cincinnati Review, Spring 2019.

“The Power of the Lens,” Elysian, Summer 2019.

“The World’s Greatest Art Fair,” Elysian, Summer 2019.

Scott Taylor (Mathematics and Statistics) coauthor, “Dehn filling and the Thurston norm,” Journal of Differential Geometry, Volume 112, Issue 3, 391–409, 2019.

Arnout Van der Meer (History), “Rituals and Power: Cross-Cultural Exchange and the Contestation of Colonial Hegemony in Indonesia,” in Cross-Cultural Exchange and the Colonial Imaginary: Global Encounters via Southeast Asia, Singapore: Singapore University Press, 75-103, 2019.

“Igniting Change in Colonial Indonesia: Soemarsono’s Contestation of Colonial Hegemony in a Global Context,” The Journal of World History, Volume 30, Issue 4, Dec. 2019.

Nicky Singh (Religious Studies) and Lucy Soucek ’18, “Sikh Interfaith Experience,” in Interfaith Worship and Prayer: We Must Pray Together (ed. by Dan Cohn-Sherbok and Christopher Lewis), London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2019, pp. 216-30.

“The Vision of the Transcendent One: Feminist Hermeneutics and Feminine Symbolism in the Sikh Scripture,” Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Indian Philosophy and Religion (ed. by Veena Howard), Bloomsbury: London, Oxford, New York, Delhi, Sydney, 2019, pp. 325-343.

“Let’s Get Off Our Cell Phones and Hear a Sikh Maxim from Pope Francis,” in Pope Francis and Interreligious Dialogue: Religious Thinkers Engage with Recent Papal Initiatives (ed. by Harold Kasimow and Alan Race), Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, pp. 235-257.

Introduction to Sikhism,” in The Encyclopaedia of Women in World Religions: Faith and Culture across History (ed. by Susan de-Gaia), Santa Barbara, 2018, pp. 292-304.

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